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city facing rising sea levels and the next big storm. >> if sandy were to come close or directly into norfolk i think we'd all be in big trouble. >> brown: we assess the latest diplomatic moves to end syria's war, as secretary of state hillary clinton meets with russia's foreign minister. >> woodruff: and ray suarez has the story of a program that aims to put students at low-achieving schools on a path to high school graduation. >> we're here to make things better. we're here to tutor kids. we're here to make sure that they stay on track. we are here to make sure that they graduate. we want to prepare tfo b : >>rown's >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. th and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for pu
vining davis foundations. >> ( choir singing ) >> "the angel gabriel was sent from god to a city of galilee named..." >> narrator: every sunday, in every corner of the world... >> "...the virgin, betrothed to a man whose name..." >> narrator: ...people gather to hear a story. >> "...and the virgin's name was mary." >> narrator: for more than 2,000 years, that story has been told and retold. >> "...and to bear a son." >> narrator: along the way, each generation has found in its telling its own meaning and interpretation. >> "'...you shall call his name jesus...'" >> narrator: that story, of a man called jesus of nazareth, a man who became jesus christ, was originally told by his first followers... >> "'...and be called the son of the most high.'" >> narrator: ...and then retold in accounts by later believers in the gospels. >> "the gospel according to st. luke." >> narrator: so began the building of a religion. now it is our turn, with the help of scholars and historians, theologians and archaeologists, to return to that time and use our best efforts to understand that story... of
is best- known for hosting the city's new year's eve celebrations. tonight, the countdown is on to 2013. ruben ramirez braved the crowds for a behind the scenes look at the preparations. >> reporter: the new 2013 sign is up, the ball drop has been tested. the revelers are gathering. it's a celebration new york city style. >> we've got neon trees, carly rae jepsen, taylor swift, jury from univison, the million dollar quartet.trffisau s ts hee president of countdown entertainment. the evening's festivities are part of a public-private partnership between his firm and the city of new york. >> you've got our costs, you've got the cities costs, it's a lot of money, but it's also one of the biggest events in the world. the promotion that new york city gets from times square new year's eve when the world is watching. that's priceless. >> reporter: and, that means lots of eyeballs for marketers. the big sponsors tonight, nivea, toshiba, philips and the ball's maker, waterford. >> first and foremost. this is a civic event and we needed partners who understood that the civic nature is the priorit
sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: tonight our focus is on what can be done so that the tragedy at sandy hook elementary school does not happen again. on friday december 14th a gunman killed 26 people, 20 of them were children between the ages of 6 and 7. it is the second deadliest mass shooting in american history. the killings have revived the debate on gun control and demonstrated the need to rethink our approach to mental illness. president obama traveled to the bereaved town to attend a community vigil and console families. here is a part of the president's address to the grieving people of that town, and to the nation. >> no single law, no set of laws can eliminate evil or prevent every senseless act of violence in our society but that can't an excuse for inaction. surely we did:do better than this. if there's even one step we can take to save another child or another parent or another town, from the grief that's visited tucson, aurora, and oak creek and newtown, and communities from columbine to blacksberg before that,
-dollar charge against fourth-quarter earnings. is this gloomy news from citi the beginning of other companies doing the same? suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: 11,000 jobs are a lot of layoffs, even for a bank as huge as citi. and there could be more. that's because the monster firm is still struggling to recover from the great recession even though it has fired a lot of other workers in the last few years. the thing is, citi has a new c.e.o. in michael corbat, and experts say he's anxious to make his mark, even if that includes cutting staff. and the need to slim down is not unique to citi; it's industry- wide. a financial industry runs into huge problems. it happened in the '30s, and it happened in the last five years. when you go through these periods, you go through a lot of change. that industry is now trying to figure out what is the right size of the industry. >> reporter: still, economists say citi's action today is not the start of a new ve aofls crfe america. the nation's job market may not be robust, but it's not frozen, either. in fact, today, the payroll firm a.d.p. reported 11
preventing a company from owning a newspaper and radio and tv stations in the same big city. thus he would give the massive media companies free rein to devour more of the competition. the chairman is julius genachowski, appointed to the job by president barack obama. now, the fcc tried to pull this same stunt under a republica chairman back in the second term of george w. bush, but at hearings held around the country an angry public fought back. >> we told you a year ago when you came to seattle that media consolidation is a patently bad idea. no "ifs," "ands," or "buts" about it. so with all due respect i ask you, what part of that didn't you understand? >> i'm a republican and i'm a capitalist, but some areas of our private sector must be regulated. freedom of information is too important, we must be oactive in protecting that fundamental freedom. >> if the fcc is here wanting to know if chicago's residents are being wewell served, the answers no. if local talent is being covered, the answer is no. if community issues are being treated sensitively, the answer is no. if minority groups a
jobs are in consumer banking. the move comes less than two months since a shakeup at citi ousting former c.e.o., vikram pandit. he was succeeded by michael corbat. the bank nearly collapsed during the crisis and ultimately received bailouts totaling $45 billion, money that citi has since repaid. roben farzhad has long watched the changes at citi for bloomberg "businessweek" and joins us again tonight. roben, welcome. today we heard that stocks soared on the news of these layoffs. what does that tell us about what was going on at citi? >> it's sad, actually. citigroup is know-- you could say the financial crisis is over but in the throes of an existential crisis. it doesn't know what it wants to be. investors have been clamoring for a while for citigroup to simplify, to shed payrolls, to be good at something. it does everything, but it isn't market leading, necessarily, in any one category. and by and large, they got the layoffs, at least the beginning round of layoffs that they wanted today. >> ifill: we know many of these layoffs are noin the u.s., but i assume part of the relati
in the previous year. one man knows a lot about that subject, new york city's deputy police commissioner, paul brown, who joins us live right now. mr. brown, congratulations. how have you done it? >> thank you, mainly through 35,000 men and women in uniform, but particularly through something called operation at attack where we send as many uniformed police officers as possible into areas where we have seen spikes and violence, particularly shootings. >> that sounds almost like a back to basics campaign. why was the decision taken to go in that direction? >> well, it started with mayor bloomberg and commissioner kelly coming into the office right after 9/11 with a deep downturn in the economy, less tax revenue. we lost 6000 police officers through attrition, we have 6000 fewer now than we had then. that forced us to take a look at how we deploy officers into the city. instead of dividing them up as we usually did into 76 precincts, we focused better on defining exactly where the most violent crimes were happening and putting the biggest number of officers there, the biggest bang for the block.
for an hour captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: let me start off. tell me what makes -- what makes a great restaurant? how do you -- >> well, what makes a great restaurant i don't know exactly. a great restaurant i think is where the owner and the chef gives all the love he can. >> rose: when does your day start? >> ooh, sometimes 8:00, sometimes 9:00, sometimes 7:00. >> rose: what's the first thing you do? >> oh, it changes a little bit. i stop at the office for 15 minutes and then i go down and look if everything is holding and look -- >> rose: see i had this impression of all of you at the fish market at 4:00 a.m. everyday saying "these are the finest and the freshest" and you're poring over the fish, picking them up and deciding "only this is good enough for my customers, my clientele." >> oh, of course, we are a very aware and we do buy the best and i think what makes a great rest vaunt the cooking also. of course the service, the ambience, and for that we buy the best, we don't wake up at 4:00 in the morning be
filled the air above sydney harbour bridge. this city's style is rather different. john yang has held what for help -- it's believed to be the first public new year celebration in north korea. burma has joined the global party. ♪ >> the end of the year would not be complete without the viral pop hit, "gangnam style" being performed with great enthusiasm. while hong kong celebrate with a virtuous so show over victoria harbor. fireworks lit up moscow's red square. in dubai, they filmed the midnight moment under the world's tallest building. the gulf states is eager to take its place among the world's best known venues for the dawn of the new year. >> no happy new year in syria. the situation is as great as ever. the bodies of 30 people found with signs of torture in a suburb of damascus. the international peace negotiator of syria urged to push for peace talks between the government and rebels. the country could become a failed state ruled by warlords. in iraq, a wave of attacks killed nearly 23 people and injured more than 80 as a car bomb in a central baghdad neighborhood killed fiv
. deserted. it feels like a road to nowhere. then we arrived in the middle of the jungle. a city is rising. this is going to be the new capital. this has to be one of the most extraordinary construction projects i have ever seen. i am on the roof of a foreign debt 50 room -- 450 room, 5 star theater that comes to the convention center and carved out of the jungle and 18 hold championship golf course. it is a spectacular vanity project in a country where most people live on barely $1 a day. equatorial, guinea is a dictatorship. his family has been accused of rampant corruption. has hadident's son assets worth 1 million euros seized by the french government. oil and gas are the keys to understanding the regime. editorial beginning -- equity torial guinea life expectancy barely topped 50. public dissent is a dangerous. anger is close to the surface. >> the people are suffering. all the oil money is taken by the president's family. no one can say anything. if you do the secret police would come to arrest you. >> the president gave me a rare interview. he is 70 but in no mood for retirement. >>
out of the city into the suburban areas that are held by the free syrian army. what you can see is a deterioration in the position of the regime and the strain of war as well. will that result in and trying to somehow do a deal? i do not know. but i know that a political deal is the only real choice the syrians have. if they do not get that, they face a long and bloody war. >> today, we have the american and russian foreign ministers meeting with the u.n. envoy to syria at a conference in ireland. russia has been a key player. do you understand whether the russians are getting closer to a western position when it comes to assad's future? >> if they are common their remarks from the meeting did not seem to suggest that they were prepared to go the extra mile or make some kind of deal. the issue is the fact that the u.n. security council is paralyzed. paralyzed over this whole issue of syria. the western countries have one position. russia and china have another. both sides actually need to move. holding on to positions that do not work. and the absence of a security council resol
and they don't belong in the streets of our city. >> woodruff: we assess the public policy questions raised by the shooting about access to guns, mental health issues, and more. >> ifill: hari sreenivasan reports from newtown on a community in mourning. >> woodruff: and as parents around the country nervously dropped their children off at school today, jeffrey brown talks to a psychiatrist and a school psychologist about what to say and not to say in times of crisis. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 enthe tgicohanetsnnt ec bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: a holiday season
captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: master ricardo muti is here, one of the world's great conductors. he has lead some of the best orchestras including the vienna philharmonic, he is currently music director of the chicago symphony orchestra, critics and audiences alike have been dazzled and charmed by the intensity, the technique, the emotion that he and his musicians bring. here is a look at a performance of verdi's requiem. >> when you look at the journey of your life, from the violin, piano, goesing, conducting, is that the perfect sign of flow for someone who wants to lead a great orchestra? >> first i didn't want to be a musician. so the first quality, i mean the first, if you don't want something and you get it. and but i studied very seriously but fortunately-- . >> rose: what did you want to be, do. >> first my father was a medical doctor. we are five brothers. and he wanted one to be a doctor, one to be an architect, one to-- my profession was opposed to become a lawyer, that would have been a disaster, total
met are dominicans. and by that evening, being the center of new york city having cable, lights, electricity. chinese guy upstairs. right next door a korean person. downstairs somebody from uruguay. the folks who are on the television, talking about all sorts of crazy stuff. i mean, sure, realism might try to approach that. but in my mind, when i was a kid, when i read about time travel. time travel felt like a much more honest description, to me, of what that meant, being transported from santo domingo '74 to new york and new jersey in '74. that was far more honest to the experience than anything i could have written realistically. >> at the age of six, you came? >> yeah, yeah. yeah, and for a young mind, i mean, it's an extraordinary leap. it's an extraordinary leap. and i think science fiction, i think fantasy, i think the genres do a wonderful job of describing all parts of, many parts of our society that realism doesn't do a great job of describing. >> didn't you say somewhere that "star wars," the "star wars" stories, you couldn't have a better framework for dramatic analy
from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we begin tonight with an assessment of the u.s. and global economy, all eyes remain on efforts to avoid the fiscal cliff deadline on january 1st, when automatic spending cuts and tax increases are set to take hold. there is growing optimism on capitol hill that a deal could come soon, yesterday president obama said he would be willing to lower his revenue goal and tax increases at 400,000 instead of 250,000 per household. >> john boehner said he developed a backup plan to avert year-end tax increases if the negotiations with president obama stalls, this occurs in the backdrop of an economic that is bettering on housing and employment data, the global economy continues fragile with the european debt crisis and china i in in. >> rogoff is a professor of public policy and economics at harvard, he is a coauthor of the best selling book, this time is different, eight centuries of financial folly, many consider it to be the authoritativeext on the impact of financial crisis around the world. i am pleased to have ken rogoff ba
city, i think we can do this. >> i do have a cynicism in me that says, you know, if we lose momentum we're going to be footnoted to the next horrible tragedy that unfolds. a month from now, two months from now. i hate that feeling. it's really cynical and a horrible thing to think. but it seems like that's sort of been the pattern over the last several years. >> i support responsible gun ownership. i've gone to firing ranges. i've fired guns. i don't own a gun. i would be happy to listen to responsible gun owners as well. i don't support banning all guns. just weapons that can just keech shooting and shooting and shooting. >> and i feel the same way. i grew up learning to shoot with my father. it's one of the few things we did together. >> the fact is we need to start enforcing laws we have. we need to make stronger laws. particularly regarding these high-powered weapons. that are brutally efficient at killing people. because there's no need for civilians to have those. i don't think we need to ban guns. i think we need to find the right balance. it may not just be the guns. it might al
york city, this is charlie rose. it is estimated that one in five american veterans in these wars suffer from severe depression or post traumatic stress disorder. retired lieutenant colonel john o blin is one of them. he served four tours in iraq and surrounding persian gulf as well as three tours on the-- tours on the border of israel and egypt, awarded the bronze star, purple heart and kbrat action badge among other commendationses. he joins me tonight to talk about his life, also joining me an extraordinary group of scien titss, mary stein from california san diego, lisa shin from tufts university, kerry russler from emory university, joann difede from cornell and my cohost is dr. eric kandel. a noubl lawyer yet, professor at columbia university and a howard hughes medical investigator. i am pleased to have all of them here this evening at this table. which begin as we always do talking to eric kandel. what are we doing this evening. >> post traumatic stress disorder. this is a fascinating disorder. and it is unique in psychiatry. it is perhaps the only psychiatric disorder who
is the central city landmark of india, that happened on a sunday, it did have the effect of creating a cat and mouse, a game between the police. the protestors were extremely angry for example that no one from the government had come out to address them on the saturday when they had been tear gassed and water canonned as they approached the president's residence. sos there a sense of a government that was tone deaf and wasn't hearing the people. and that just made them more enraged. so in many ways it was an invitation for them to come back. so yes, the crackdown not only angered people but i think generated a lot of heat, that said, on sunday, which were the especially violent, especially violent protests, the numbers were a lot fewer. >> suarez: well, you talk about tone deaf politicians, have the nation's leaders heard the protestors now. are they responding in a different way? >> well, they're trying. the government has responded with what many governments often respond to in crisis management situation, commissions and inquiry, emotions are running very high and the call for capital p
studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. begin this evening with politic. less than a month remains for lawmaker to reach a deal before the fiscal cliff deadline. the whitehouse open sists tax rates must rise on higher incomes in order to balance spending cuts but republican leadership remains committed to extending the bush tax cuts for all a tax bracket. brainer offer his response to the president. in an interview with julianna goldman of bloomberg news obama called the boehner plan quote out of balance. >> i think that we have the potential of getting a deal done, but it's going to require what i talked about during the campaign which is a balanced responsible approach to deficit reduction that can help give businesses certainty and make sure that the country grows. and unfortunately the speaker's proposal right now is still out of balance. he talks for example about $800 billion worth of revenues but he says he's going to do that by lowering rates. when you look at the math, it doesn't work. >> rose: and here is the president talking about why it's essential for him that there
childhood no longer exist. >> after hurricane city ravaged the nation, the nation's top chris christie, a romney supporter, buddying up to president obama. >> when you know you have a responsibility to those folks, you could give a damn about the politics. i could care less about politics. >> what is chris christie's future? >> re-election looks quite probable, to the point where the mayor of newark, seen as his principal opponent, has decided to look in other venues to pursue his own political future. he recorded the highest favorable job rating ever found in any governor of new jersey after his handling of sandy. >> did that natural disaster and the reaction of governor christie and the reaching out to the president -- did that help president obama? >> it certainly did. i do not think it was decisive. if the election had been held a week earlier and you look at the polls, and to was a lot closer. i think obama would have won, but it would not have been an electoral landslide. i think his 2.8% advantage in the popular vote probably would have been a pointless. people ask how important
female health workers killed in different parts of karachi, another in a different city as they tried to vaccinate against polio. police say the -- it is clear these were coordinated attacks. the taliban are in charge of this area, says the mother of one of the victims. they say this polio-polio program was planned by america ftoish off our nation. they shot my daughter in the head. in the 1990's, about 20,000 people and here in pakistan were affected by polio. that came down to just 28 in 2005. but the numbers have risen since then and there is a risk they could rise further. what changed was propaganda from the pot -- the pakistani taliban. bay said the health workers were spies from western agencies and that they would sterilize children. began the program in some areas and workers were beaten out in others. then the militants found another justification for their position. when american -- america try to use a pakistani doctor and a fixed -- fake a vaccination program to get information about the home of bin laden. >> unfortunately, and in advisedly, they employed a health a vacci
city, bishop robert finn was convicted of a misdemeanor for not reporting the discovery of child pornography on a priest's computer. finn's sentence of two-year's probation was suspended. he was the first bishop to be criminally sanctioned. there were leadership transitions for several major religious groups. new orleans pastor fred luter became the first african-american president of the southern baptist convention, the nation's largest protestant denomination which was founded in support of slavery. in england, justin welby, a former oil executive who had been a bishop for just one year was selected to be the next archbishop of canterbury, spiritual head of the worldwide anglican communion. and in egypt, bishop tawadros was selected as the new coptic pope, succeeding pope shenouda the third, who died in march. by tradition, he was selected by a blindfolded boy who picked his name out of a crystal bowl. kim, thank you for that survey. we are all mourning the slaughter of the children in connecticut. what have you heard religious leaders say about that, and our response to it? >>
laws in the city. it did not do much to cut down on the violence. it took a lot of policing to do it. go on the internet and find out when you come up with gun- control. george washington. fire arms ban next to the constitution itself. they are the americans liberty. try to stem gun sales in this country you will run into a serious roadblock. >> australia had a mass killing in the mid-90's's. it passed a severe loss where all existing guns had to return then. the government brought them back. after a certain date if there were in your home, you were arrested. they have had a decrease in crime, especially in suicide, an interesting development. it seems to me you either have to go that route, which you cannot in the u.s. -- gun ownership and australia was 5% of households. hear, gallup has shown is 47%. we have a second amendment and the whole history going back to washington. given that we are a different culture, the kinds along that we pass are almost always an effective as a result because there are 300 million weapons out there today. unless you recall them the way australia did
sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> good evening. tonight i can roar to the american people and to the world that the united states has conducted an operation that killed osama bin laden, the leader of al-qaeda. and a terrorist who is responsible for the murder of thousands of innocent men, women and children. for over two decades, bin laden has been al-qaeda's leader and symbol, and continued plot attacks against our countries, friends and allies. the death of bin laden signifies the most significant achievement to date in our effort counterterrorisms professionals to work tire loalsly to achieve this outcome. the american people do not see their work nor know their names but tonight they feel the satisfaction of their work and the result of their pursuit of justice. >> rose: that was president obama in may announcing the killing of america's most wanted terrorist. a new film about to be released by the oscar winning director kathryn bigelow and screen writer mark boal examines the ten-year hunt for bin laden. it is called zero da
. it -- >> this city alone, where we're sitting, new york city, needs $50 billion to repair from the hurricane. >> once you get it rolling, there is plenty of stuff to do. so the notion that we don't have things that need to be done that could employ lots of people from very low-skilled people to more middle and high-skilled people, that's just a myth. >> there was a poll just the other day that you probably saw. something like half of all republicans believe that the 2012 election was stolen for obama by a group called acorn, which was -- which went out of business several years ago. it doesn't even exist. i mean, they just believe these conspiracy theories. and they circulate without barrier, because nobody will say anything to disagree with it. and if you hear the same propaganda over and over and over again, eventually you're going to start to believe it. >> there's this tremendous amount of brainwashing that goes on. and i don't understand how it happens. people convince themselves, you can understand it more in the public companies, because these guys have to get up and tell things to shareholder
communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: maestro gustavo dudamel is here, berlin philharmonic once called him the most astonishingly talented conductor industry ever come across. he is beloved bolivar orchestra in vendz well, ven venezuela anw is with the la philharmonic. ♪ >> rose: he is in new york to, bolivar orchestra in carnegie called, voices from latin america, also dedicated further musical education and social justice around the world, i am pleased to have gustavo dudamel at this table for the first time. >> thank you. it is an honor. >> rose: my pleasure. >> huge honor. >> rose: we have been wanting to do this for a while. tell me about the music you have selected for the performance. >> yes. this is a festival called dos americas here in new york, and we decide to bring, you know, this amazing music that we have, this very latin, in a ways of irs stick but deep music by es at the vek, villalobos, by ar bon, carlos chavez, so for us it is very important to show the soul of our music also, also to play the strauss ballad, but especially, you kno
? an elementary school student near salt lake city brought a gun to school saying he wanted to protect his friends. instead, he allegedly used it to threaten his classmates. as the good book say, get with it. train up a child, and when he is old, he will not depart for it. ready, aim, fire. for the child who has everything this season, how about body armor? a utah company named amendment two offers a new line of it for kids. mother jones magazine reports sales have tripled in one week. a massachusetts company is promoting the bullet blocker, a ruggedom ctepur backpack siteedgn for work or play, made of the same materials used in bulletproof police vests currently on sale for the holidays for $199.99. on facebook, an outfit called black dragon tactical that sellt this message. arm the teachers. in the meantime, bulletproof the kids. this market never closes. america's turned violence into a profit center. if you haven't finished your christmas shopping, no need to wait for santa. his sleigh couldn't even hold the heavy weapons. step this way. black friday is every day. we have something for everyon
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)

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